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How to create fast database queries

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Happy New Year!

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In my New Year posts I usually try to recap and summarize the past year. It won't take long this time:

Fuck you, coronavirus!

Now that I've gotten that off my chest, I have to think of something to write about in this New Year's post.

So I was thinking, why not put a face to the name we all hate so much?

Let's use SQL to do some ray tracing and draw a 3D picture of the dreaded virus.

By now, I believe we are all familiar with the picture of the virus. It looks like a ball covered with spikes. The spikes look something like the solar corona, which is what gave the virus its name. They have this distinct triangular shape.

We'll create a sphere covered with several dozens of spikes.

Every spike will be a small pyramid, with an equilateral triangle as a base and isosceles triangles as lateral faces. This means it will be a right pyramid.

The pyramids will be "standing" on their apexes, upside-down. The height of every pyramid will be perpendicular to the sphere surface and continue the sphere's radius at the apex.

Then we will implement the pinhole camera model and use ray tracing algorithms to calculate the lighting of the sphere and the spikes.

Types

3D modeling heavily uses vector algebra. Of course pure SQL offers enough math functions to get around. But functions and routines are not first class citizens in SQL, which means we would have to copy-paste the bulky vector manipulation formulas every time we will need them, which would make our query unwieldy really fast.

This is a good chance to get familiar with PostgreSQL's rich system of custom types and custom operators. It lets users define their own types, create functions to work with them and even overload the operators.
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Written by Quassnoi

December 31st, 2020 at 11:00 pm